Author Archives: Vin Getz

MLB World Series: Teams that Have Come Back From Down 2-0

The 1996 New York Yankees Were The Last Team To Come Back From 2-0 To Win The World Series

The 1996 New York Yankees Were The Last Team To Come Back From 2-0 To Win The World Series

Out of 109 completed World Series, about half – 53 – started out with one team going up two games to none over the other.

Of those, only 11 times has the team down 2-0 come back to win the championship. And of those, four – that is only four times (!) – has the team with home field advantage come back to win it all.

Let’s check the percentages on all this. Down 2-0? Then, actually not too bad considering the circumstances – you’ve got a 21 percent chance of winning the World Series.

However, if you lose those first two games at home, things dwindle to a 5.7 percent chance (three of 53). I’m not including 1921, because back then teams alternated playing at home with the home field advantage team getting Game 7.

The upshot is, if the Kansas City Royals (who gained home field advantage thanks to the American League winning the All-Star Game) lose again tonight, things won’t be looking good at all for a title. Then again, they didn’t look good in 1985, either. The Royals happened to be one of those home teams.

SEASON WINNER LOSER SERIES
1. 1921 New York Giants* New York Yankees 5-3
2. 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers New York Yankees 4-3
3. 1956 New York Yankees Brooklyn Dodgers 4-3
4. 1958 New York Yankees Milwaukee Braves 4-3
5. 1965 Los Angeles Dodgers Minnesota Twins 4-3
6. 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates Baltimore Orioles 4-3
7. 1978 New York Yankees Los Angeles Dodgers 4-2
8. 1981 Los Angeles Dodgers New York Yankees 4-2
9. 1985 Kansas City Royals* St. Louis Cardinals 4-3
10. 1986 New York Mets* Boston Red Sox 4-3
11. 1996 New York Yankees* Atlanta Braves 4-2

* home field advantage

Photo: Susan Walsh, AP via nytimes.com

Biggest Blowouts in World Series History (Game)

Bill Dickey And Tony Lazzeri Had Home Runs In The 1936 Game 2 Blowout

Bill Dickey And Tony Lazzeri Had Home Runs In The 1936 Game 2 Blowout

It seems more often than not, World Series games (if not the Series themselves) are close.

Out of all those meetings (631 of them through 2013), only 17 (2.69 percent) were blowouts of 10 runs or more. In the last 30 years, we have seen only seven such games.

There hasn’t been a beating of this kind of magnitude in a good six seasons. The Boston Red Sox were the last team to hand one out, whupping the Colorado Rockies 13-1 to open the 2007 Fall Classic sweep.

The biggest blowout ever was a 14-run annihilation of the New York Giants by the eventual champion New York Yankees in 1936.

It’s doubtful we’ll see anything of this sort in 2014 with the pitching-focused talent of both the San Francisco Giants and Kansas City Royals.

Check out what happened in 1960 – it has to be one of the greatest World Series of all time. The Yankees beat the Pittsburgh Pirates by 13 in Game 2, by 10 in Game 3 and by 12 in Game 6. But the Pirates won the Series in Game 7, thanks to Bill Mazeroski‘s walk-off home run.

SEASON WINNER LOSER GAME RUN DIFF.
1. 1936 New York Yankees 18 New York Giants 4 Game 2 14
2. 1960 New York Yankees 16 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 Game 2 13
2. 2001 Arizona Diamondbacks 15 New York Yankees 2 Game 6 13
4. 1951 New York Yankees 13 New York Giants 1 Game 5 12
4. 1960 New York Yankees 12 Pittsburgh Pirates 0 Game 6 12
4. 1968 Detroit Tigers 13 St. Louis Cardinals 1 Game 6 12
4. 1982 St. Louis Cardinals 13 Milwaukee Brewers 1 Game 6 12
4. 2002 San Francisco Giants 16 Anaheim Angels 4 Game 5 12
4. 2007 Boston Red Sox 13 Colorado Rockies 1 Game 1 12
10. 1911 Philadelphia Athletics 13 New York Giants 2 Game 6 11
10. 1934 St. Louis Cardinals 11 Detroit Tigers 0 Game 7 11
10. 1959 Chicago White Sox 11 Los Angeles Dodgers 0 Game 1 11
10. 1985 Kansas City Royals 11 St. Louis Cardinals 0 Game 7 11
10. 1996 Atlanta Braves 12 New York Yankees 1 Game 1 11
15. 1960 New York Yankees 10 Pittsburgh Pirates 0 Game 3 10
15. 1978 New York Yankees 12 Los Angeles Dodgers 2 Game 5 10
15. 1982 Milwaukee Brewers 10 St. Louis Cardinals 0 Game 1 10

Photo: lonecadaver.com

NFL: Tight Ends with the Most Receiving Touchdowns (Career)

Antonio Gates, Superman

Antonio Gates, Superman

The tight end watch is getting really interesting. Already this season, Jason Witten became only the third tight end in NFL history to breach the 10,000-receiving yards plateau. He’s now second all-time behind Tony Gonzalez after surpassing Shannon Sharpe just yesterday.

Twelve-year San Diego Chargers tight end Antonio Gates is now at 9,556 yards and needs to average just 50 yards a game the remainder of this season to become the fourth member of the 10,000-yard club.

Check out the top 20 tight ends with the most career receiving yards in this previous post. There are a couple more actives on the list.

When it comes to tight ends with the most career receiving touchdowns, there are definitely some differences.

It’s still Gonzalez at the top (he is arguably the greatest offensive TE, ever), but it’s Gates this time who’s actually pretty close to topping the record, as opposed to Witten (much farther)  in the yards chase. No way Gates will do it this season – he still needs 18 TDs to break the record. So it will be dependent on whether he returns for 2015. That would most certainly clinch it.

Witten, a little surprisingly, is seventh all-time, behind even the San Francisco 49ersVernon Davis.

Rob Gronkowski already has 46 touchdowns and just made the pros in 2010. Jimmy Graham has 44 and also came through in 2010. These guys have a long way to go yet in the yards department, far below their more aggressive TD pace (but understandable given the short sample of about 3.5 seasons).

Makes you think…there are three kinds of “offensively-performing tight end types”: those who specialize more in scoring, those who collect yards (and probably rescue the quarterback quite often) and the elite who do both.

TIGHT END RECEIVING TOUCHDOWNS FROM TO
1. Tony Gonzalez 111 1997 2013
2. Antonio Gates 94 2003 Present
3. Shannon Sharpe 62 1990 2003
4. Jerry Smith 60 1965 1977
5. Vernon Davis 55 2006 Present
6. Wesley Walls 54 1989 2003
7. Dallas Clark 53 2003 2013
7. Jason Witten 53 2003 Present
9. Dave Casper 52 1974 1984
10. Ben Coates 50 1991 2000
11. Keith Jackson 49 1988 1996
12. Raymond Chester 48 1970 1981
13. Ozzie Newsome 47 1978 1990
14. Rob Gronkowski 46 2010 Present
15. Rich Caster 45 1970 1982
15. Kellen Winslow 45 1979 1987
17. Jimmy Graham 44 2010 Present
18. Mike Ditka 43 1961 1972
19. Paul Coffman 42 1978 1988
19. Todd Heap 42 2001 2012

Photo: K.C. Alfred via utsandiego.com

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 158 other followers

%d bloggers like this: