Tennis’ Career Grand Slam Winners, All-Time Men

Roy Emerson (l.) And Rod Laver Are The Only Tennis Players To Win All Four Majors More Than Once

Roy Emerson (l.) And Rod Laver Are The Only Men’s Tennis Players To Win All Four Majors More Than Once

If we consider just the Open Era – when professionals were invited to play all four tennis majors for the first time in 1968 (Australian Open in 1969) – then only four men have won a career Grand Slam (at least one of every major).

They are Rod Laver, Andre Agassi, and the still active Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. Quite an elite group. Nearly 50 years of Open Era tennis and only four players have won all four majors: Australian, French, Wimbledon and U.S.

Not even Ivan Lendl (never won Wimbledon), Jimmy Connors (no French Open), Pete Sampras (no French Open) nor Bjorn Borg (only French Open and Wimbledon wins) can claim a Grand Slam.

If you go back to the very beginnings of all four “tournaments,” another three players make the Grand Slam cut. Check out the all-timers below.

What about the ladies? See the women’s all-time Grand Slam winners tomorrow!

PLAYER MAJOR WINS
1. Andre Agassi Australian Open 1995, 2000, 2001, 2003
French Open 1999
U.S. Open 1994, 1999
Wimbledon 1992
2. Donald Budge Australian Open 1938
French Open 1938
U.S. Open 1937, 1938
Wimbledon 1937, 1938
3. Fred Perry Australian Open 1934
French Open 1935
U.S. Open 1933, 1934, 1936
Wimbledon 1934, 1935, 1936
4. Rafael Nadal Australian Open 2009
French Open 2005-2008, 2010-2014
U.S. Open 2010, 2013
Wimbledon 2008, 2010
5. Rod Laver Australian Open 1960, 1962, 1969
French Open 1962, 1969
U.S. Open 1962, 1969
Wimbledon 1961, 1962, 1968, 1969
6. Roger Federer Australian Open 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010
French Open 2009
U.S. Open 2004-2008
Wimbledon 2003-2007, 2009, 2012
7. Roy Emerson Australian Open 1961, 1963-1967
French Open 1963, 1967
U.S. Open 1961, 1964
Wimbledon 1964, 1965

Photo: southwest.usta.com

Posted on May 31, 2015, in Tennis and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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